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Sarah al-Amiri is proud to be part of the project spacecraft called HopeSarah al-Amiri is take incharge in UAE mars mission

Sarah al-Amiri is taken in command of UAE mars mission Abu Dhabi, One of the United Arab Emirates, Sarah al-Amiri studied at an astronomy book with a photograph of Andromeda, the giant galaxy neighboring our MilkyWay. I can’t describe it, al-Amiri said in an interview, “but just to realize that something that was printed on page was larger than anything that I’ve ever seen and minimizes the planet that I live on.

When she was in college, there were few opportunities in West Asia to pursue studies of the universe, and al-Amiri majored in computer science instead. But now, the UAE is aiming to inspire its youth to pursue science and technology careers, and al-Amirihas forged a career pursuing the heavens.

Sarah al-Amiri Just 33 years old, she is the head of science operations and the deputy project manager for a space probe that the UAE is about to send to Mars.

A rocket lifting spacecraft called Hope is to begin its journey to Mars soon. Bad weather at the launchpad postponed the scheduled liftoff Tuesday. The UAE Space Agency announced that the next launch attempt would be on Friday.

The launch will be the boldest move yet by a country that is looking to establish a future that will long outlive its oil wealth, and sees a space program as oneway to accomplish that goal.

Mars will be much in the news for the next month,once-every-26-month interlude when Earth and mars lineup to allow robotic spacecraft to make a relatively quick trip.

After several delays, NASA’s next Mars rover, Perseverance, with instruments to search for chemical signs of past life, is scheduled to launch July 30.

China will also try to launch an ambitious mission to Mars, Tianwen-1, in about a week. A fourth mission, which would put a Russian-European rover named Rosalind Franklinon Mars, was pushed off the calendar because of technical hurdles that could not be cleared in time.

Preparations for Hope, the smallest of the bunch, proceeded smoothly, and was now the first to be ready for lift-off. Because the UAE  doesn’t yet have its own rocket industry, it bought the launch for Hope aboard H-IIA rocket from Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, a machinery maker in Japan.

About the size of a Mini Cooper car Hope is to arrive in orbit around Mars in February. The spacecraft which costs about $200 million to build and launch will carry three instruments an Infrared spectrometer an ultraviolet spectrometer and a camera.

From its high orbit varying from 12,400 miles to 27,000 miles above the surface, Hope will give planetary scientists their first global view of Martian weather at all times of the day. Over its two-year mission, it will investigate how dust storms and other weather phenomena near the Martian surface speed or slow the loss of the planet’s atmosphere into space.

That, however, is not the main reason that the Emirates government built Hope.“A lot of you might ask us, ‘Why space?’ Omran Sharaf, the Hope project manager, said during a news conference Thursday.“It’s not about reaching Mars.”

Rather, Sharaf said the country’s primary aim is to inspire school children and spur its science and technology industries, which, in turn, will enable the Emirates to tackle critical issues like food, water and energy

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